1 in 6 people in NYC (1.4 million) rely on daily emergency food. (Source: Robin Hood Foundation)

News

  • Revamping Community Colleges to Improve Graduation Rates
    July 7, 2016

    Offer students a less confusing array of courses. Require fewer remedial classes to improve students’ basic math and English skills. Or find a way to pair these not-for-credit courses with others that would provide progress toward a degree. Provide more personal advice. And lower the cost. While some of these steps might seem more obvious than others, they are among the changes community colleges across the country are making in hopes of ensuring that more students graduate.

    Read more at nytimes.com
  • College Loan Glut Worries Policy Makers
    June 7, 2016

    The U.S. government over the last 15 years made a trillion-dollar investment to improve the nation’s workforce, productivity and economy. A big portion of that investment has now turned toxic, with echoes of the housing crisis.

    Read more at wsj.com
  • Hidden Side of the College Dream: Mediocre Graduation Rates
    June 7, 2016

    To rise in society, “go to college” is such a proven prescription that Michelle Obama made a rap video of it. But while, on average, college graduates have lower unemployment rates, earn higher wages and even have longer-lasting marriages, there’s less discussion of the many students lost between enrollment and graduation.

    Read more at nytimes.com
  • How USC Became a Leader in Recruiting Minorities
    June 7, 2016

    Wealthy private colleges and universities are under the microscope for failing to open their doors to more smart students from poor families. Congress has asked 56 private colleges with endowments of more than $1 billion each for detailed information about their holdings. Some lawmakers would like to force these elite institutions to devote at least 25% of their annual endowment income to financial aid or lose their tax-exempt status. Berkshire Hathaway chief Warren Buffett recently chided schools with large endowments and high tuition for not spending more on aid.

    Read more at wsj.com